Home How To How to Prevent Facebook From Sharing Your Personal Data

How to Prevent Facebook From Sharing Your Personal Data

by George Mensah
facebookprevent..slashbeats

Online life includes irritating but important security audits. Numerous internet users’ data has been compromised by hacks big and small, therefore it’s up to you to ensure sure social networks and apps aren’t harvesting more information than they should be.

Consider the Cambridge Analytica controversy. The controversy broke out in 2018, even though the data used was stolen from Facebook in 2014. However, in 2014, gathering that information was fairly simple and legal up until the time the gatherers clashed with Facebook and the social network came under fire. Facebook was astonished (astonished!) by what transpired.

However, big tech corporations make a lot of money from your information, either by selling it directly to other parties or by using it to offer you products (Facebook puts data trackers inside other apps(Opens in a new window)). The social network has made it a little bit easier for you to protect some of your data, but it hasn’t totally stopped people from learning personal information about you. And it won’t ever.

Having said that, there are some Facebook account limits. The tools, however, can be challenging to understand. Implementing some of these can restrict your Facebook usage as well as your ability to access other websites. But it’s a beginning. Because limiting access to your information as much as you can is essential for some piece of mind short of cancelling your Facebook account.

Limit the Apps and Websites Settings

Settings & Privacy > Settings > Apps and Websites should be your first stop. On a mobile device, select the hamburger menu and proceed in the same manner.

All of the applications and websites above have access to your Facebook data because you linked with them or logged in to them using your Facebook account. Some of them can post to your Facebook account. To view shared content, click View and Edit. Each program’s information access will be shown in a pop-up window; you may alter these settings to limit the information an app can access while still keeping it installed. Inform apps that you do not wish to share your friend list, timeline posts, status updates, events, or other data. App by app, and site by site, is how it must be done.

Although some sites and apps on the website claim to be the “most recent,” others date back many years. I should delete anything more than a year old; if it’s something you’ll actually use again, you can log back in later via the corresponding app or website (unless you block it, see below). The “posts, videos, or events [the app or site] placed on your timeline will likewise be deleted” if you do this.

When you’re done, anticipate a confirmation screen that looks clumsy and suggests that it might take some time for all the data and connections to be deleted. (You know how it’s usually fast when you spend money, but it takes a bit to obtain a return to your credit card.)

View Removed Apps And Websites

Click the View Removed Apps and Websites link while you’re on that same page to see a pop-up list of all the accesses you’ve previously deleted from your account.

When you click the View link for each, you’ll get information about when you removed it (on some entries, but not all), as well as information about your user ID with the provider that powers each app or website. There is a link to each company’s privacy statement, if one is available, if you want further details. Many of the links I clicked led to 404 error pages, although this is common with aging services.

Nuke Third-Party Access

You should go to Preferences at the bottom of the page, where you can first enable or disable the ability to log into third-party apps and websites with Facebook. If either entry for Apps, Websites, and Games or Game and Apple alerts is selected, click Turn Off next to it.

If you do this, Facebook will no longer use your Facebook login information to connect to any third-party apps or websites. You won’t be able to use Facebook to log onto websites or games, transfer content between apps, or perform any immediate customization. Any apps that you have logged into using Facebook will deactivate you.

You should go to Preferences at the bottom of the page, where you can first enable or disable the ability to log into third-party apps and websites with Facebook. If either entry for Apps, Websites, and Games or Game and Apple alerts is selected, click Turn Off next to it.

If you do this, Facebook will no longer use your Facebook login information to connect to any third-party apps or websites. You won’t be able to use Facebook to log onto websites or games, transfer content between apps, or perform any immediate customization. Any apps that you have logged into using Facebook will deactivate you.

Turn Off Off-Facebook Activity

Both parties exchange data. Even when you aren’t using Facebook directly, Facebook is still monitoring some of your online browsing habits. That’s because many websites—mostly via ad links—share information about you with Facebook.

However, you have the option to see and delete that data. Access Your Facebook Information under Settings & Privacy > Settings. Outside of Facebook. To view the whole list of sharers, click Recent Activity. (It’s likely that you’ll need to enter your Facebook password again.)

If there is a direct link, clicking Clear activity history at the top will disconnect your Facebook from those accounts and clear out all the information Facebook is holding. The advertisements you see are unaffected. To prevent the other websites from connecting in the future, you may also click Disconnect Future Activity. Additionally, this prohibits you from later using Facebook to log into other websites, but you may always return to approve future activity or links.

Even without data sharing or even cookies, none of that will prohibit Facebook and other websites from utilizing your browser fingerprint to determine who you are.

Check Up on Your Privacy

Even without data sharing or even cookies, none of that will prohibit Facebook and other websites from utilizing your browser fingerprint to determine who you are.

For instance, your hometown and birthday under Who Can See What You Share aren’t actually necessary for anyone to know as they are required for security on other websites. Additionally, make sure you limit who can access your full list of friends or the pages you follow under the Friends and following section. Scammers use these to gather names to create fictitious profiles with, so they may defraud more individuals in the future.

Read more; HOW TO FACTORY RESET YOUR MACBOOK BEFORE YOU SELL IT

Never having an account on Facebook is the only surefire method to be completely free from tracking and privacy violations by the social media platform. Deleting your account—not merely deactivating it—is your next best option. Delete your accounts on Instagram and WhatsApp as well, as Meta also owns those services.

You may also like

Leave a Comment

This will close in 0 seconds